Sunday Sentence: String Too Short to be Saved by Donald Hall

“I understood that my grief, which I still carried like comfort, was not for my grandfather. The red branch on the green trues not only the first limb of the Republic to feel the cold of the winter; it was the death of my childhood, and the knowledge of my own vulnerability.” – String too Short to be Saved by Donald Hall

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I love reading them, so now I’ve joined the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without comment” that hit me where I live. Do with it what you will.

Sunday Sentence: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“It brought to him a disorienting strangeness, because his mind had not changed at the same pace as his life, and he felt a hollow space between himself and the person he was supposed to be.” – From Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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I love reading them, so now I’ve joined the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without comment” that hit me where I live. Do with it what you will.

Sunday Sentence: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

“He was the sort of fellow that kids laughed at and dogs wanted to bite.”-Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

There are other, more poignant moments in this beautiful book but for some reason I this sentence grabbed me during a recent re-read. I know that sort of man. I know those kids. I felt a prickle of discomfort when I realized I probably had been one of them.

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I love reading them, so now I’m joining the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without commentary.

Sunday Sentence: Walden by Henry David Thoreau

“The hawk sat on a limb three feet above my head and did not stir as I walked under – that was the first sign.” – From Bill McKibben’s introduction to Walden by Henry David Thoreau

This edition of Walden is a particular joy because of the spare, on-target interpretation of Bill McKibben. I bought this book as a companion for my walking. I dip in regularly.

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I love reading them, so now I’m joining the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without commentary.

Sunday Sentence: Get in Trouble by Kelly Link

“What you deserve and what you can stand aren’t necessarily the same thing.” – Kelly Link, Get in Trouble

The stories in this collection prove the power of simple sentences. When arranged in the right and sometimes unexpected ways, they offer a world that may look skewed on the outside but very familiar in the inside, where most of us live.

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I love reading them, so now I’m joining the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without commentary.

Sunday Sentence: Youngblood by Matt Gallagher

“I took in a deep breath of wet cigarette and watched the green camo nets ripple slowly with the wind, marking time.” – Matt Gallagher, Youngblood

There are small stories in every sentence in this novel, just one of the reasons I slowed down as I neared the end. I didn’t want to finish so soon.

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I love reading them, so now I’m joining the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without commentary.

Sunday Sentence: Wanderlust, A History of Walking by Rebecca Solnit

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“Exploring the world is one of the best ways of exploring the mind, and walking travels both terrains.” – Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust, A History of Walking

Because I love walking. And Solnit’s book.

I love reading them, so now I’m joining the #SundaySentence party started by David Abrams over at the Quivering Pen and on Twitter. It’s not a review. It’s not a story. It’s just one sentence I read this week, presented “out of context and without commentary.